Introducing: Patrizia Moroso, Official CWID Ambassador

Contemporary is proud to announce that design luminary Patrizia Moroso is joining us to bring you Contemporary Wine In Design, as an Official CWID Ambassador this October 15th.

It is beyond a doubt that Patrizia Moroso is one of international A+D’s leading lights. Recognised as one of the champions behind many of the biggest names in design today, Moroso has been a key figure in the development of a formal aesthetic language and sensibility industry-wide.  Among the blessed who have had the opportunity to collaborate with the powerhouse behind her eponymous design studio – Moroso – include her long-time friend Patricia Urquiola’s; the fresh, young talent of Nipa Doshi and Jonathan Levien; even stalwarts Issey Miyake and sculptor Ron Arad in ground breaking collaborations that fuse fashion, sculpture and furniture are all indebted to her unique vision.

Patrizia Moroso has teamed up with friend and performance artist Marina Abramovich for an unusual contemporary art installation. She has given a voice to the creative visions of the likes of Ross Lovegrove, Tom Dixon and Sebastian Herkner.  Renowned for marrying traditional craft with sophisticated production techniques to deliver a brand, Moroso, that sets the pace of design, Patrizia Moroso is unquestionably design royalty.

As such, Contemporary is proud to announce that Patrizia Moroso  – Design’s very own doyenne – has joined forces with Contemporary Wine In Design as an Official Ambassador, this October 15th. In partnership with the tea at Mobilia, Patrizia Moroso is heading over to Perth to present the latest developments in design thinking at Design Circus this Thursday. On Saturday, the hottest offerings of Moroso will be in pride of place at the new Mobilia showroom for #CWID16 – a real international exclusive!

Stay in touch with Contemporary as we chat with Patrizia Moroso about what’s really shaking up the disciplines and ideologies behind A+D today throughout Contemporary Wine In Design.

Brought to you by Indesign Media Asia Pacific, Alice Blackwood – editor of Indesign Magazine – caught up with Patrizia Moroso at Salon del Mobile earlier this year. Here’s what makes Patrizia Moroso tick:

INDESIGN MELBOURNE EDITOR, ALICE BLACKWOOD: Tell me about your family history with Moroso, obviously your parents started the brand. Was it always a given that you would take up the directorship?

MOROSO CREATIVE DIRECTOR, PATRIZIA MOROSO: The story starts in 1952 – my parents started the company when they were very young, just 16 and 20 years old. They were in the industry because the little city where they lived, and the city where I was born, was a sofa production district. It was a local craft, people were making sofas, curtains, all the things relating to fabric. And so they started their company as two young people, with sisters, cousins, friends. I was born three years later. I remember the atmosphere at the time because I was born in to it. We didn’t have a nanny, so from day one I was in the factory – I really grew up there. I played with fabrics and pieces of wood as toys.

BLACKWOOD: Is it still run as a family run business? What is that dynamic like?

MOROSO: Yes, my father and mother are over 80 now, but they still come in everyday at 8.30 in the morning. In the beginning the dynamic was a little bit hard maybe – I started in the 1980s. I had been [abroad] as you do at that age, but I came back at a time that was a critical moment for the economny, critical for the company,  but I returned with my ideas. I had studied at art school, I had some friends in design, and some ideas. My parents were welcoming – they said ok! They were happy to see their daughter involved I think. I started to try and realise [some of my ideas] with my friends. One was Massimo Losa Ghini, who was 22 at the time, but later became a very famous designer in Italy and founded a movement called Bolidismo. We made a collection together, it was very funny, very special. The collection is no longer in production, but it was a fantastic, formative experience. It gave me an idea of what to do next, and to see how to do things totally differently to what had been done before in the company. It was a great way to improve and learn.

BLACKWOOD: What was your vision for Moroso then, and has this continued through to today?

MOROSO: When you start you don’t I don’t think you have a precise idea. I had this intuition, that if you do something interesting, the media will talk about you, and if the media start to talk about you, you start to have a name, a brand. I was not conscious so much, but I was sure that making important things in terms of design, as well as making a brand and building the image of the company, would in turn build out the future of the company. That was the beginning. In 1991 we released our fist collaborative collection, and now we are celebrating 25 years.

BLACKWOOD: Texture and materiality is such a strong theme in all of Moroso’s work, always. Tell me about the textures that you’re playing with this year?

MOROSO: Fabrics and surfaces in general are so important. Like I was saying before, this has been in my blood forever. Suppliers are so important. Sometimes we need a very specific material or texture, and many times the fabrics that we work with are created especially for us on the project of the design – so the same designer that is designing the furniture, is also designing the fabric. I think if you want a special personality in your object, you have to pay a little more, but you end up with something that’s only for you. I always ask my designers to think a lot about how to do and what to use. Materials are very important, not just to make a shape, that is easy. I want them to make something more. I try to follow projects that have something different inside.

Moroso
moroso.it

Mobilia
mobilia.com.au